Tag Archives: 爱上海BF

Student group, professor discuss Gregori Murals

first_imgThe Native American Student Association of Notre Dame (NASAND) hosted a town hall Tuesday to discuss the representation of Native Americans in Luigi Gregori’s murals depicting the life of Christopher Columbus located in the Main Building. NASAND vice president, senior Armani Vaniko Porter, and professor of art history Michael Schreffler reflected on the significance of the murals and answered questions from audience members.Schreffler said art historians would not expect 19th-century paintings to be historically accurate representations of the subjects they portray.“It would be like sort of expecting a Hollywood film to be accurate,” Schreffler said of the murals. “What’s interesting about them certainly is the relationship between the story that is being told but at the same time, the attitudes of the people who hired the painter and the attitudes of the painter.”The murals draw a parallel between the life of Columbus and the founding of the University, Schreffler said, and some of the paintings include figures from the University.“In some ways it parallels the story of the University of Notre Dame as it’s conveyed, for instance, on the University website, which is also sort of an against-all-odds story — financial struggles in this undertaking, hard winters,” Schreffler said. “There were other barriers as well — the fire of 1879 [in] the administration building. So that’s how I see it. The purpose, I would say, is to construct an identity or participate in constructing an identity for the University.”Porter said, however, that the murals send a symbolic message of oppression. The paintings’ portrayals of Native Americans is an example of this message.“I actually took my first visit to Notre Dame after being accepted,” he said. “I remember just walking down the halls and not really having a lot of words at first. One of the first things that came out to me when I first saw it was just how strong the power differential is in every single one of these paintings. The fact that that is so heavily emphasized is the thing that stood out the most to me.”For Porter, the murals reflect a tendency to ignore differences in students’ cultural backgrounds.“In our fervor to make the Notre Dame community, we inadvertently homogenize and we strip away that which makes us unique or that which makes us culturally unique,” Porter said. “And that is something that is inherently oppressive to those who are of minority populations.”During the question and answer session, Julie Dye, a member of the Pokagon band of Potawatomi Indians in Indiana who attended the town hall, said the murals portray a stereotype of Native Americans that is often promulgated in schools.“We have a problem in this country with education from kindergarten on up … and we need to correct that,” Dye said. “This would be a good start. And by removing these murals, I’m not asking to destroy them, but remove them and put them somewhere else. Because if you just put a plaque up, you’re missing out because the visual impact of art is a big part.”Carla Getz, who is also a member of Pokagon band, said she is also frustrated with the representation of Native Americans in the murals.“According to all the murals and the statues, we all look like alike. We didn’t. We don’t look alike,” Getz said. “We don’t dress alike. We have things that are indigenous to our own culture, to our own tribe, and that’s all being forgotten.”Though Porter said he believes the murals should be taken down, he said others within NASAND fear that removing the murals would erase the “true history” of Notre Dame’s relationship with Native Americans.“We have groups that may wish to keep them up, but to have a strong and decisive explanation of what occurred … an addressing of what has occurred, what is our true history,” Porter said. “We have to come to grips with that, regardless of how embarrassing or dirty it might be or look to the administration.”Tags: Gregori Murals, Main Building, Native American Student Association of Notre Dame, Pokagon Potawatomilast_img read more

Former MEP says ‘fatally flawed’ FRC should be shut down

first_imgA leading critic of the UK Financial Reporting Council (FRC) has called for the audit and corporate governance watchdog to be shut down. Sharon Bowles, a member of the UK parliament’s upper chamber and former MEP, told IPE: “The FRC is fatally flawed in the way it was set up and has been operating, and distance needs to be put between that culture and the future regulator.“This is most likely to be effective if the FRC is wound up and a comprehensive, fully accountable companies regulator set up that is not based on trade association relationships and which follows fully all the principles of public life.”Her intervention in the debate over the future of the FRC came as the UK Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) invited the public to submit evidence to its inquiry over the regulator’s future. Bowles’ comments added to growing support for a major shake-up at the watchdog. In March, the Local Authority Pension Fund Forum said the FRC should be wound up.Sir John Kingman, who is leading the inquiry, said: “The FRC’s work is critical to financial markets, the economy and public confidence. Trust, quality and credibility are the questions at the heart of [the] consultation.“The review wants to hear the widest possible range of views on how the regulatory system can best deliver for the future.”Among the areas covered by the inquiry are the FRC’s legal status, its relationship with government and its handling of conflicts of interest.Interested parties have until 6 August to make their views known.Under-pressure regulatorThe FRC has come under fire in recent years over claims that it was too close to the audit profession that it regulates, and that it had failed to take timely action regarding high-profile corporate collapses.During a parliamentary hearing into the collapse of services group Carillion in January, politicians accused the regulator of being “toothless”, “useless” and “ineffective”.FRC chief executive Stephen Haddrill argued in the regulator’s defence that it needed greater powers in order to address the perceived shortcomings.The Kingman inquiry has been taking evidence from interested parties since April, but in its latest call for evidence opened its doors to the wider public for input. Bowles said she had already met Sir John to give evidence and had urged him during their meeting to take more views into account.As for the likely outcome of the review, she added: “It is too soon to know how the Kingman review will go but the questions are comprehensive.”She also warned against shying away from wide-ranging reform of the watchdog.“When solutions are asked for, there is always the risk of the status quo being preserved because there is no single solution – even if the status quo is by no means given majority support,” Bowles said.Last month, Sir John unveiled the membership of an 11-member panel of experts and accounting insiders to assist him during the review process.An FRC spokesperson told IPE: “We welcome this independent review of the FRC’s governance, impact and powers. It is an opportunity to assess our past and our future.“The board is determined to meet public expectations and support UK business in attracting global investment for the long term.“We hope interested stakeholders will respond to Sir John Kingman’s call for evidence.”last_img read more

30 MLB players we’ll miss watching most on what should have been Opening Day

first_imgToday, March 26, was supposed to be Opening Day.That’s not happening, as you know, but that’s not going to stop us from dreaming about what might have been, even as we watch the smorgasbord of baseball games from the past that are being broadcast all day long.  Why him? Because if the Reds are going to be legitimate contenders in 2020, they need Votto to be the Votto of old. And what better time to start than Opening Day? Nolan Arenado, 3B, RockiesWhy him? It was — well, it has been — an interesting offseason for Arenado and the Rockies, and watching him play again would have been great for Rockies fans. Here’s one player from each team we were especially looking forward to seeing perform on Opening Day. MORE: 15 things we miss most about baseballAmerican League Andrew Heaney, SP, AngelsWhy him? The Angels wasted no time naming the lefty as their Opening Day starter this spring. This was supposed to be his first Opening Day nod, which is a pretty cool honor for any pitcher, and that’s reason enough to watch (and it’s the reason we’ll pick another couple of players on this list). But, there’s also this: Heaney didn’t hold back when asked for his thoughts about the Astros and their cheating scandal this spring, and guess who the Angels were scheduled to play on Opening Day. The popcorn was already ready. Jose Altuve, 2B, AstrosWhy him? Because it’s impossible to think about the Astros and their first game of 2020 without thinking of the sign-stealing scandal that broke this offseason. And Altuve somehow became the central figure in this scandal despite the data showing he heard the fewest trash can bangs recorded in 2017. But Altuve hit the home run off Aroldis Chapman in the 2019 ALCS and told his teammates not to rip off his jersey as he approached home plate. And, well, that just seemed all kinds of suspicious. So, to pick one Astros player the most eyes would be on, the nod goes to Altuve. And now we’re done with sign-stealing scandal stuff, I promise. Mike Fiers, SP, AthleticsWhy him? OK, one more, dammit. The A’s hadn’t announced their Opening Day starter yet, but Fiers was certainly a possibility. He got the nod for the first game in 2019 and was a reliable part of the A’s rotation last year, posting a 3.0 bWAR and 3.90 ERA in 33 starts. Fiers, of course, is the player who went on the record with The Athletic and kicked the whole sign-stealing scandal into high gear. So, yeah, his first 2020 start would have been interesting. Worth noting, though, that the A’s host the Astros in the second series of the season, so if the A’s wanted to make sure Fiers wouldn’t face the Astros — seems like an unnecessary early season distraction — they could have pushed him back to start the third game of the year. OK, THAT is the last scandal mention. Double promise, pinkie swear. Vladimir Guerrero Jr., 3B, Blue JaysWhy him? Because he’s kind of amazing and is likely to have a monster season, and popping a couple baseballs over the fence wouldn’t have surprised anyone. Shane Bieber, SP, IndiansWhy him? Bieber is coming off an outstanding season — fourth place finish in the AL Cy Young award and All-Star Game MVP — and was scheduled to face the rebuilding Tigers at home. Feels like a no-hitter, or at least a shutout, was on the table. Kyle Lewis, OF, MarinersWhy him? Lewis, the No. 11 overall pick in the 2016 MLB Draft, skipped over Triple-A last year and posted a .885 OPS in 18 big-league contests for the Mariners last year. He’s likely to have his ups and downs, but he’s an outstanding talent and watching him hit that spring training grand slam was a lot of fun. Chris Davis, 1B, OriolesWhy him? Because hope springs eternal, and Davis was on fire this spring. And, sure, spring stats mean very little, but when you’re talking about a player with a -4.8 bWAR and 53 OPS+ over the past two years combined, any little sliver of success is welcome. Joey Gallo, RF, RangersWhy him? Because we were deprived of Gallo for far too much of a 2019 season — his year ended July 23 when he went on the DL with a broken hamate bone in his right hand — that was setting up to his the breakthrough year we’ve all been waiting for. Jose Martinez, DH, RaysWhy him? Because Martinez feels like a perfect fit for Tampa Bay, a professional hitter without much of a defensive position who is finally in the American League and can shine, primarily as a DH but also spot starter at first and in right field. And what better way to get going than with two or three hits at his new home against an NL team?Alex Verdugo, RF, Red SoxWhy him? New face in a new place, replacing a superstar in Mookie Betts. Intrigue. Adalberto Mondesi, SS, RoyalsWhy him? He’s fun to watch, especially when he gets on base. Big season could be in the works, if he figures out how to get on base more regularly. Miguel Cabrera, DH, TigersWhy him? Because, as I said when I watched a Tigers game from the press box this spring, any time you can see a future Hall of Famer play, that’s a good day. Jose Berrios, SP, TwinsWhy him? His breaking stuff is just mesmerizing. Berrios is coming off back-to-back All-Star seasons and he’s still just 25 years old. Last year, he got the Opening Day nod and struck out 10 in 7 2/3 shutout innings at home against Cleveland. This assignment, at Oakland, would be been a bit tougher but still a chance to shine. Luis Robert, CF, White SoxWhy him? The White Sox took “service time” distractions off the table, signing Robert to a deal that guarantees $50 million over six years, and has team options that could add two years and $38 million. All this despite that he’s yet to make his big-league debut, which is why we picked him here. Robert was brilliant in 2019, batting a combined .328 with a 1.001 OPS, 32 homers and 36 stolen bases at three levels in the White Sox organization. Gleyber Torres, SS, YankeesWhy him? Because he’s pretty much the only healthy starter, right? Really, though, Torres has been exactly the player Cubs fans feared he would be when their favorite team traded him to the Yankees for rental closer Aroldis Chapman (though he did contribute to that little World Series title). MORE: Rob Manfred hopes baseball can resume before JuneNational LeagueRonald Acuña, Jr., BravesWhy him? Because he’s a damn superstar, that’s why. Christian Yelich, RF, BrewersWhy him? Has any trade ever worked out any better than the Brewers’ deal to land Yelich? He’s been an incredible player — one MVP award and one second-place finish — and this offseason agreed to a lucrative extension to stay in Milwaukee for a long, long time. The Brewers were supposed to open their season at home against the Cubs, and the home-crowd reception would have been really something. Jack Flaherty, SP, CardinalsWhy him? How do you follow up an incredible finish — he had a 0.93 ERA in his last 16 starts — to the 2019 season? Well, that’s why we picked him. Javier Baez, SS, CubsWhy him? He’s a star, with a flair for performing on the big stage. Like, for example, Opening Day 2019, when he popped a pair of homers and had four RBIs in a win against the Rangers on the road. Starling Marte, CF, DiamondbacksWhy him? It feels like years ago that the Diamondbacks acquired the two-time Gold Glove winner from Pittsburgh. But he’s coming off back-to-back 20/20 seasons, and all eyes would be on him for his first regular-season game in his new uniform. Mookie Betts, RF, DodgersWhy him? Well, duh. Johnny Cueto, SP, GiantsWhy him? He’s only made 13 starts the past two years, but he’s healthy and was named the Opening Day starter. Cueto gives a clinic on disrupting batters’ timing, every time out. Lewis Brinson, CF, MarlinsWhy him? I am going to believe that Brinson can develop into a star until the day he retires, apparently. He’s been, well, not good in the bigs so far, but Brinson was pretty good this spring — .345 average, three homers in 13 games — and I know spring stats don’t mean much, but I would have been watching and hoping Opening Day would have been his new, fresh start. Jacob deGrom, SP, MetsWhy him? Because when a two-time Cy Young winner takes the mound, you watch. Juan Soto, LF, NationalsWhy him? Soto and Acuña — who finished 1-2 in the 2018 NL Rookie of the Year voting — will be linked as long as they both defy their ages and play like superstars, and they’ll always be worth watching. Tommy Pham, LF, PadresWhy him? Pham feels like the perfect addition to a Padres team that’s on the rise, and I’d expect that impact to be obvious from Day One. Or, y’know, Opening Day. Bryce Haper, RF, PhilliesWhy him? Boring choice? Yep. But you’ll be watching, too. Jarrod Dyson, CF, PiratesWhy him? Been a fan of Dyson since his days as the speedster who helped the Royals thrive in 2014-15, and because that’s what speed do. Joseph Daniel Votto, 1B, Redslast_img read more